2016 © King Art Collective

RICHARD SILVER

About The Artist

Richard Silver is New York born and Bred (raised in Brooklyn and now lives in Manhattan), but to him, home is where his camera is. Richard has visited 73 countries and more than 200 cities in his life, traveling to 13 countries last year alone. Even through his diverse former career paths that included Beverage distributor, Wall Street Broker, and Manhattan real estate Agent, he’s always maintained a passion for photography and started shooting full time in 2011.

 

Richard’s love for travel has afforded him many opportunities to shoot different cities and cultures. He loves iconic architecture, whether it’s ancient or modern, and is always focused on documenting beautiful structures in each new city he visits. Richard loves using techniques such as Tilt Shift, HDR, Vertical Panoramas and Time Slice to present our everyday world in an altered visual context. His work has been exhibited in museums and galleries around the country, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Skyscraper Museum and Krause Gallery in New York. Corporate clients include UNAIDS, Bank of America, Macy’s AT&T, Tiffany’s and IKEA.

 

Currently on exhiibt at Bank of America Plaza, 540 W. Madison, Chicago IL by Appointment Only.    Contact Amy at King Art Collective for viewing and inquiries - 773-562-2054  

Size Medium Edition Print (only) unframed

16” x 24” Digital C Print 10 $250 $500
24” x 36” Digital C Print 8 $500 $1,000
30” x 45” Digital C Print 6 $750 $1,750
40” x 60” Digital C Print 4 $1,000 $2,500

 

Artist's Statement

The “Time Sliced” Project started in New York City, originally as a book idea. I would go out at sundown and photograph iconic NY skyscrapers. I finished with 38 different buildings. When I looked deeper into the cost of book production, it just wasn’t economically feasible to do a book. With a few different ideas of how to portray the photos I came up with the Sliced idea. Each photo consists of usually 36 photos taken at approximately 30 minutes before sunset, 

through sunset and 30 minutes after the sun sets. Ending up with anywhere from 40-60 photos I figure out which photos I want to use for the final photo. I do my adjustments working in Lightroom and Photoshop, and then line them up in the order from day to night, left to right. My intention with the project is to show the light of day turning into the dark of night in one single photograph.